Reflecting on Childbirth after Losing a Womb to Cancer: Part 2 – After-Birth

Painting by Carl Vilhelm Holsøe (Danish; 1863–1935) From PART 1: BIRTH: [T]he doctor responded matter-of-factly: “Yes, but he has asphyxia from swallowing and inhaling meconium in the amniotic fluid. He’ll probably be brain damaged and need to take phenobarbital for the rest of his life.” Part 2: After-Birth To this day, I cannot believe this elder statesman of… Continue reading Reflecting on Childbirth after Losing a Womb to Cancer: Part 2 – After-Birth

My Story – Uterine (Endometrial) Cancer: Three-Month Reviews, Views, & News

Cancer Awareness Ribbons - Foundation for Women's Cancer As I mentioned in the November 15, 2013 post, awareness ribbons are all over the web, although the color schemes may not yet be standardized (and ribbons and products related to causes have become very commercialized). I happened to wear a turquoise-aqua-tealish-color sweater (with matching socks!) to my medical appointments… Continue reading My Story – Uterine (Endometrial) Cancer: Three-Month Reviews, Views, & News

My Story – Uterine (Endometrial) Cancer: Cancer No More–The “da Vinci” Code & Diagnosis

 Very glad to be home after surgery and recuperating well, with what I hope are only a few more bumps in the road to traverse. Here I offer a few more details about my brief hospital stay and its aftermath for those who are interested. Some of what follows is of minor importance and is… Continue reading My Story – Uterine (Endometrial) Cancer: Cancer No More–The “da Vinci” Code & Diagnosis

My Story – Uterine (Endometrial) Cancer: How to Make a New Cancer Patient Feel a Bit Better

The Bottom Line, Upshot, or Whatever Directional Phrase You Like Well, I am thankful to say that I seem to have found a good doctor. I saw my new gynecologic oncologist yesterday afternoon in West Orange, NJ. Not surprisingly, when I arrived I found out that the MRI report from Tuesday night had not been… Continue reading My Story – Uterine (Endometrial) Cancer: How to Make a New Cancer Patient Feel a Bit Better